Theodore Olson

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Theodore Olson, born in Chicago and raised in California, graduated from the University of California at Berkeley and then went on to serve as an Assistant Attorney General for President Ronald Reagan and then politics called again when President George W. Bush took office. He was nominated as the 42nd United States Solicitor General and served between June, 2001 and June, 2004. The praises for his abilities boggles the mind as he continues to push the barriers and define a new and more fair society.

Olson was recognized in the ''Thinkers'' category along with his TIME Magazine award in April, 2010. He and another attorney, David Boies, worked diligently in their efforts of challenging the constitutionality of California's Proposition 8. Called one of the most ''compelling advocates'', Olson says his work with this civil rights issue was both humbling and gratifying.



Despite these many impressive career hallmarks, Olson, born September 11, 1940, knows the devastation this life is capable of handing any of us. He lost his wife during the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Barbara Olson was a passenger on American Airlines Flight 77 that crashed into the Pentagon that tragic day. Now recently remarried, he's as focused as ever on changing the legal landscape in American law.

There were rumors Olson would be nominated to fill Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's vacancy when she retired; however, other plans were in the works. When the negative democratic response to President Bush's desire to name Olson as Alberto Gonzales' successor to the Attorney General's post grew, many believe both the Bush Administration and the country as a whole missed out on a powerful and ethical candidate. He continued advising President Bush and heads of the Executive Branch departments. After Presidents Reagan and Bush left office, he continued to serve both in their private legal affairs.

To date, Olson has argued 56 cases in the Supreme Court; one he is most proud of was Bush v. Palm Beach County Canvassing Board in 2000. He also argued Bush v. Gore that same year. Both cases were a result of the controversy surrounding the Presidential elections that year in Florida. With the exception of his two times working for the White House, Olson has been employed with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher since 1965. He is currently based out of its Washington D.C. office. He now focuses much of his energy on appellate and constitutional law, federal legislation, medial disputes and major cases involving both domestic and international parties.

Whether it's the First Amendment, Equal Protection and Due Process Clauses or immigration, antitrust and the environment, you can be sure a formidable opponent is found in Theodore B. Olson. As mentioned, Olson has remarried and he and his wife, Lady Booth, also an attorney from Kentucky, now reside in Washington DC after a wedding ceremony in Napa County, California.

For more information on Theodore Olson, visit his firm's site at GibsonDunn.com.

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