Exit interviews can say a lot about a company
Are you an Employer?    Attract the Best Candidates with Smart Job Postings! Search Legal Resumes
Legal Jobs Board for Attorneys, Law Students & Legal Staff | Serving USA & Other Countries | LawCrossing

Need Help? Call (800) 973-1177 

Job Seeker Login   Employer Login 

Job Seekers?  Try it Now  

ATTORNEY JOBS
LAW STUDENT JOBS
LEGAL STAFF JOBS
Download LawCrossing Online Apps: Click here  
See Law Jobs We Have Recently Researched and Located for You
What Where
Show Recruiter Jobs  

Show Refreshed Jobs  



Search in Job Title Only
Job Type:
Employer Type:

+ Browse Legal Jobs     + Advanced Search     + Search Tips     + Upload Legal Resume
Legal Jobs >> Legal Articles >> Career Corner >> Exit interviews can say a lot about a company
  • Career Corner

Exit interviews can say a lot about a company


by      
Subscribe to LawCrossing  
 Share on Facebook
 Twitter
By submitting above you agree to the our Privacy policy.

Like LawCrossing on Facebook


    OfficeTeam, a Menlo Park, Calif., staffing company for administrative workers, says that its survey of 150 executives found that 19 percent of companies doing exit interviews with departing employees always act on the information they learn, while 57 percent say they act on that information "somewhat frequently."

That quickly leads to the question: Why didn't these companies pay attention to these employees while they were on the payroll?

"In some instances, exit interviews are an admission that your company is closed off to employees," says Ed Rehkopf, a longtime hospitality executive based in North Carolina and author of the book "Leadership on the Line" (Harvard Business School Press, $26). "Simply having that policy says your company has been deficient in listening to its employees."

Exit interviews have long been held up as a sign that companies welcome a candid assessment of their operations and are willing to listen to suggestions that could help them operate more efficiently.

Diane Domeyer, executive director of OfficeTeam, says that soon-to-be ex-employees should take the time to share their insights when leaving a company.

"It's not always easy to offer constructive criticism, but this feedback is valuable to the employer, as long as it's delivered diplomatically," she says.

The problem is, exit interviews are a hit-or-miss proposition. Not all companies do them, nor do most of the companies have a uniform way of handling them.

"In some companies, they are more of a formality," says Rehkopf. "They are often done by someone in administration, usually someone in human resources. These people are not necessarily in a position to fix any problems they may discover in the exit interview."

He says most companies don't do a good job of regularly soliciting employee feedback and considering it.

Every employer he's ever worked for has had an open-door policy, even though Rehkopf admits that few of them meant it.

"More than an open-door policy what you need are managers and leaders with open minds," he says. "Those are the kind of people who care about how the company is being run and really do have an interest in making it better.

"As a manager, if I heard about the same problem more than once, I'd want to fix it. Unfixed problems fester and continue to bubble under the surface."

The nature of management is all about developing good relationships between supervisors and employees. Rehkopf views it essential that managers develop tools to understand how their employees feel about their jobs, so that they can develop smoother operating systems or remove obstacles that might stand in the way or productivity.

"I think if a supervisor wants to hear the truth, they're going to figure out a way to hear it," he says. "I don't think they are going to sit back and wait for someone to quit to figure out what they need to be doing."

Yet, Rehkopf estimates that only about 10 percent of supervisors foster environments that help them create better workplaces.

"This is an important thing, particularly with front-line managers," he says. "Managers and leaders need to understand how to build relationships with workers, how to encourage them and motivate them to do their best."

Yet work environments that don't support a candid flow of information back and forth are hampering in themselves.

Rehkopf says employee feedback is too crucial for companies to ignore and that it shouldn't wait until someone is leaving the company to glean the thoughts of employees.

"The exit interview is not the tip of the iceberg," he says. "The exit interview is the back-end of the iceberg."

© Copley News Service


Related Article
Pontiac's G6 convertible has a lot going for it, but there are compromises

I left my house and headed for work in a Pontiac G6 GT convertible - top down, blue sky, ball cap, sunglasses, 75 degrees and rising. ....

Lorraine Koc Does a Lot of Everything as Vice President and General Counsel of Deb Shops, Inc.



Lorraine Koc has spent almost her entire legal career working in-house. For more than 20 years, she has served as General Counsel for Deb Shops, Inc., a national retail clothing chain for teenage and pre-teen girls. Koc decided early on that building an in-house career would be more satisfying than working at ....

A lot goes into researching and networking until you find that right Job

Perhaps your firm is downsizing; perhaps you have some ethical concerns regarding company activity; perhaps you are moving to a new city for personal reasons, such as your spouse accepting a new position or your child enrolling in a private school. Are you prepared to make a change in your career? ....
Rate This Article
   Current rating: 10   |   View top rated articles

Printable Version    Printable Version PDF Version    PDF Version Email to a Friend    Email to a Friend
Comment    Post A Comment View Comment    View Comment Discuss    Discuss

Featured Testimonials

A very well planned site. Really quick and a joy to go through.
Robert

Facts

LawCrossing Fact #123: You can quote us. We get thousands of visitors each week looking for that special piece of advice to keep them going. We know what we’re talking about.

"We want to hear your thoughts. Please comment on this article (below)!"

Comments


Article ID: 2238    

Article Title: Exit interviews can say a lot about a company

Comment not found for this article.

Comment Comment

Facebook comments:


total jobs
69,733
Upload Your Resume
New Legal Jobs in Last 7 Days
19,708
Facebook Twitter
job search tip
Opportunities are everywhere. A change in senior management spells personnel changes down the road. New management wants new blood. Learn to read between the lines and anticipate openings.
2014 Most Influential Legal Recruiter Rankings
Get the ranking

Your privacy is guaranteed. We will never give out, lease, or sell your personal information.


Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss it, you will land among the stars.